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Guest_Kristen_*
post Sep 5 2006, 07:35 PM
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I am looking for different kinds of lesson plans for speech therapy. The school that I am working for is now requiring the speech pathologists to write weekly lesson plans for each child receiving speech. Please share with me your lesson plans so I have something to work off of. Thank you very much!
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Guest_Lou_*
post Sep 5 2006, 07:41 PM
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You should be writing your plans based upon the students' IEP goals. I am not convinced that obtaining plans off of this website is going to help you much.

Should your administrator question what it is you are doing on a weekly basis, you may need to educate him/her as to what your role is in the school setting. It is NOT like traditional classroom education and the more informed your administration is with regard to that, the better off you will be in the long run.

If he/she is not satisfied with viewing behaviorally described plans to meet your goals (as you would write them in the first place), ask the person to give you a written example of what it is they are looking for and go from there.
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Guest_Guest_*
post Sep 5 2006, 07:57 PM
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Ick. That's pretty much a terrible task to have to do. You have to submit group lesson plans or individual lesson plans?

We use an IEP computer program that will generate reports. One report is called the objectives worksheet and it lists a child's name, IEP date, and objectives by number. You can then use a simple group grid, slate a goal and pencil in an activity. Now, if you have to get into state curriculum standards, then you are even more up a creek. Our IEP program DOES correlate objectives to state essential skills, but it isn't always grade relevant.

What I would do for a group is list students, goal #s only, and the activity. I would attach objective worksheets if needed. Otherwise, I will not list other supplies, data, or anything else. Principals need to learn that SLPs are busy enough without adding another FORM to our loads. If it actually helps your planning, all the better... but it seems like unnecessary work just to make you more like a teacher.


Date ___________

Group names _________, _______, _________, _________

goals addressed ________, _________, __________, _________

Activity : SPARC Syntax book, pages 12 - 13

I'd make a simple form with the group dates and names pre-filled.

Do these plans have to be turned in ahead of time?? I'm sure someone has the perfect form already made (mine can't be emailed or I'd try to help).

Good luck.
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Guest_Guest_*
post Sep 5 2006, 08:04 PM
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Lou answered before I did, and I do agree with her (him??). You do need to line out the difference between SLP services and teachers. I never write lesson plans like teachers. I would do what I spoke of above ( a planned group activity and perhaps how that will be facilitated with different goals ) but I wouldn't make it look like anything more than it is.. a good old fashioned treatment plan.

students, goals, activity, date.. hopefully he is asking for these at the end of the week and you can pencil in as you go, otherwise, have fun doing these ahead of time!

What did the previous therapist file??
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Guest_Guest_*
post Sep 5 2006, 09:17 PM
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I have a question. I know how to write lesson plans on and give therapy to one client, but when it comes to a group of students, I break down and cry. If they have different goals/problems how do you address those? How many activities are you supposed to do? How do you measure your goals? I am very detailed when writing soap notes on one client. Isn't harder to do group therapy? I am going to do my first externship in a school adn I am nervous. My experience has been clinical focused and I really love it. But I dont know if that's gonna work in a group
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Guest_speech_*
post Sep 5 2006, 10:05 PM
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Is it your principal requiring you to write lesson plans or the head of the SLPs?? If it's the head of the SLPs I would ask for a copy of the lesson plan template they are wanting you to use along with examples.

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Yep
post Sep 5 2006, 10:58 PM
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"I have a question. I know how to write lesson plans on and give therapy to one client, but when it comes to a group of students, I break down and cry. If they have different goals/problems how do you address those? How many activities are you supposed to do? How do you measure your goals? I am very detailed when writing soap notes on one client. Isn't harder to do group therapy? I am going to do my first externship in a school adn I am nervous. My experience has been clinical focused and I really love it. But I dont know if that's gonna work in a group"


It's a skill and you will learn it just like any other. I've supervised lots of interns/CFs/assistants who ask for the "key" to group therapy. You really have to give up some of your control issues, in my opinion. First you pick a general activity that covers as many kiddos as possible, then you take a deep breath, proceed and *react*. After you've done it for a while, you will have it down to 2nd-nature. Group therapy can be very beneficial and rewarding. I don't feel that my individual clients progress that much faster (perhaps because they have more severe issues, but still not to say that individual is better).

I love social groups. I love language groups. Artic groups are easy (don't necessarily love them). What gets hard is when you have that one artic, 3 language, all in one group. Sticky notes, data tabs, abbreviations, and a great memory are all very helpful.

You learn to dissect a lesson into its listening, speaking, semantics, syntax, phonological, and fluency requirements. You can have a child working on carryover give oral directions to a child working on comprehension. You can teach visual phonics to your language kids so that they can cue placement with you. Kids love being a team. It all works out in the end. I find it much more challenging and fun. Some days one kiddo's goals get hit hard, the other's get mentioned. You try your best and *forget the SOAP notes* and everyone will see you for the great therapist you are. Innovation and reacting to student learning/needs is the key. It can't be taught in clinic, but it can be quickly learned.
Don't fret!
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Guest_Guest_*
post Sep 8 2006, 10:38 PM
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It would be easy not to have to worry about that, but when you're billing Medicaid, you have to take data every session. It's difficult to juggle this, esp. if you have a group of 4-5, they're all Medicaid, plus it's a mix of artic, lang, and/or fluency! Aaargh! In addition, we are pushed to use curriculum materials (oh it's so fun chasing the teachers down for voc. lists, keeping up with which stories and/or topics are being discussed...this is my 4th year in the schools, & this year I feel like I'm drowning more (in data & planning) now than I was my 1st year!!!
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Yep
post Sep 9 2006, 12:33 PM
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Yes, but "keeping data" is not SOAP notes. I have billed Medicaid (SHARS in Texas) for 8+ years and been through several audits and never ever had an issue. I do not write SOAP notes. I take baselines, do therapy, and take probes weekly or every two weeks. Our medicaid data forms require no more data than a checkbox on subjective, a good progress or no progress, or the like. Audits ask for logs (goals, attendance, progress), but no specific "check box" requirements.

I actually take more (informal, not always reported) data for my own use than I do for Medicaid. So, I'd say the students NOT on medicaid are just as monitored.

I would still recommend ANY new student/clinician working in groups for the first time to forget their traditional data methods and focus on teaching. I have supervised too many clinicians who spend more time on paperwork than on interaction with students. You don't get the good data without putting in some work with the kiddos first. Good graduate programs teach this properly. Some settings ruin it with tick mark requirements that are absurd. I don't think it's Medicaid's fault, at least not in this state.

I stand by my advice to the student... relax on the detailed data and work on detailed interventions.
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Guest_cmckslp_*
post Sep 9 2006, 03:49 PM
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I feel I have so much going on in a day that it is really difficult to stay organized and provide good treatment to every student on my caseload. Here is what I do for lesson plans, to keep myself organized:

I have Word doc templates with every student group listed that I see on that day. My district requires daily notes, so I really try to get to them every day. After I do that, I fill out the lesson plans for the next therapy session. I just write something simple, like "Con't Lindamood, p. 27 vowels and mirror" or "is/are verbing with bingo." Before I go home, I gather all the materials I will need for the next day, make copies, etc., so I'll be ready to go and can just fly through the day like I must, anyway.

Catherine
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Guest_Barbara_*
post Sep 16 2006, 03:08 PM
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Can you tell me what state you are in? We have some administrators in Nevada now asking for lesson plans. I believe that if you quote CFR on what speech pathologists are and do in schools, we are not designing lessons, we are designing interventions/therapys that address the individual needs of students on our caseloads. I was a regular education teacher for over 20 years before becoming an SLP, what I did then were lessons, that is different from what I do now. I'm afraid unless school SLPS stand up and let administrators know what IDEA 2004 (CFR) says, we will become classroom teachers in small groups.
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spchtx
post Sep 16 2006, 06:29 PM
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Yuck! Having to do a lesson plans that someone else could actually follow would be challenging. I usually complete my "lesson plans" at the end of each session, but it is definitely in a shorthand that probably only I would get. I do have a set of lesson plans that I periodically update, for the days I need a sub. This is a rare occurance though, so I don't have to change them very often, and I give a copy to my principal.

As someone else mentioned, my "lesson plans" consist of a short list of what we will work on. (ex: what ?'s) Then the name of book/pg/activity we will do to solicit this. If I have different kids working on different goals, I write their initial next to their goal. Again, it is very shorthand. After the session, I write brief results. (ex: John-/k/ w/ min cue)

I keep a tally sheet for each kid, and this is how I track progress during a session. Most times I tally each session, but if interrupts the flow of therapy, I do not tally at that time.


As for working with different goals... I usually try to keep my groups all artic or language. Doesn't always happen in the real world, but it is my goal. :-) After six years in the schools, I still find mixing artic/lang goals to be one of the biggest challenges. (Besides the large caseload.) What I usually do is a turn taking activity, so I can address the individual goal during each kids turn.

It really gets fun when you have to throw in a voice kid or stuttering kiddo. :-)

I think behavior management is the biggest key to a group working successfully. During the first few weeks of therapy, we review the rules regulary, so everyone is on the same page. Consistency is very important.
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Guest_slp45_*
post Sep 16 2006, 10:14 PM
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You get subs??
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spchtx
post Sep 16 2006, 11:07 PM
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It is rare, and usually only if it is a planned absence. (ie: I have a conference, or need to catch up on testing.) My principal is wonderful, and very accomadating. If it's planned, I also have some choice in the sub I get, so the 3-4 times I have done it over the years, I've used the same sub. She's watched me do therapy, and she's at our school all the time, so she knows the kids. Under different circumstances, it probably wouldn't work as well as it does.

I'm actually on a leave of absence this year with my yougest daughter. I contemplate changing to a school district closer to where I leave, but I know I am very fortunate to work with the principal and staff that I work with. I've worked in other districts and states, so I recognize and appreciate the good thing that I have. It usually balances out the negatives. Usually. :-)
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