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> question for school SLPs
Guest_questioning_*
post Aug 15 2006, 05:15 PM
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I was wondering if the school SLPs are on the same payroll as regular teachers, i.e. do they reach a maximum in their pay just like teachers do? Thanks
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Guest_Kim_*
post Aug 15 2006, 05:22 PM
Post #2





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I work in the public schools and I receive the same salary as a teacher with a master's degree and my number years of experience. I know some districts provide salary supplements, however, but don't know if there are a lot that do.
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Guest_Guest_*
post Aug 15 2006, 06:16 PM
Post #3





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All jobs seem to have a maximum level of salary and it is
definitely no different in the schools for SLP's.
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Guest_Yep_*
post Aug 15 2006, 08:53 PM
Post #4





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I make 6,000 over a teacher's salary. We get a bonus for masters and CCC's.
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Guest_Yep_*
post Aug 15 2006, 08:55 PM
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I forgot to mention that our steps "top out" at about 20 years experience.

Once can negotiate a *little* in some school districts if they are very desperate.

I was able to get two years experience and start on step 3 without any experience in
the public schools.
I don't like this new message board, off topic.
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Guest_Lou_*
post Aug 15 2006, 09:52 PM
Post #6





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Yes, I get paid on the same salary scale as a teacher. That also means that I have the same responsibilities as a teacher in my district (such as keeping a lesson plan book, lunch duty, evening events throughout the year...).

This can work to my advantage as well. I get the same amount of prep time as a teacher and cannot work for more than 2 1/2 straight hours without having some break in between. This can be a scheduling nightmare, but if I can't make "all of the students fit", I defer to the building administrator.

I've said this on other threads and I'll repeat it. Not my problem to make sure every mandated kid is on my caseload. That is a staffing issue for the building administration to handle.

Curious, Yep. What state are you in that you get a salary supplement for having your CCCs and masters??? Don't you need a masters degree anyway?
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Guest_Yep_*
post Aug 15 2006, 11:35 PM
Post #7





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TX

It's a district stipend. It's not state mandated. We get the masters bonus just because teachers get the masters bonus. Ours is a little higher because finding SLPs (with masters) was VERY difficult for a while. Our 6,000 over step pay (we have our own salary scale is very, very cheap compared to hiring contract therapists, even considering benefit packages.

Yes, you need a masters in Texas, but we do have licensed assistants to fill shortages. Supervision is a constant issue as is caseload.
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Guest_Yep_*
post Aug 15 2006, 11:36 PM
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Sorry for the typoes- I really need to register so that I can edit posts.

I left a parentheses out, among other things, and the post dosn't read right.
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Guest_Sue_*
post Aug 16 2006, 10:14 AM
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The school district I currently work for counted my internships in grad school as a year of experience, so I started one higher than what is typical (on the teacher's salary schedule).
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Guest_Lou_*
post Aug 17 2006, 06:01 AM
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Yep, I am sorry, I guess I am having a difficult time understanding...

Does a person require a master's degree to teach in TX? Naturally, as an SLP, you will have an MS or MA (I get that part).

It is a minimum requirement here in NY.
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Guest_anne_*
post Aug 17 2006, 10:36 AM
Post #11





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Yes, In our districts in NJ teachers and slp's get paid the same. Infact we are listed as teachers for administrative purposes !
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Guest_Guest_*
post Aug 17 2006, 07:21 PM
Post #12





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QUOTE (Lou @ Aug 17 2006, 06:01 AM)
Yep, I am sorry, I guess I am having a difficult time understanding...

Does a person require a master's degree to teach in TX? Naturally, as an SLP, you will have an MS or MA (I get that part).

It is a minimum requirement here in NY.

Oh, I see what you mean... No, teachers do not need masters. However, many of our teachers have masters because we have more incentive for highest qualified provider in TX.

I thought you meant masters to work in the schools in speech. We have bachelors' TEA certified teachers with speech therapy specialties who are allowed to practice in the schoools only. However, this is a grandfathered certificate and no new ones are given.

So msot school speech have masters and we get the same masters bonus (3,000) that a teacher would get. However, even the BA speech therapists get a 3,000 bonus for speech credentialing without a masters.


BA teachers = X
masters teacher = X +3,000
BA speech therapist = x +3,000
Masters SLP = X +6,000

I have no idea what the bachelor's level SLP assistant makes...


I guess I should have compared to a teacher with a masters. I made it more confusing. Sorry.
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Guest_slpca_*
post Aug 18 2006, 12:53 PM
Post #13





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I work as an Independent Contractor in the schools in California through a small agency and make $74,000/year. Much higher than a teacher. In Ca we are also on teachers pay scale.
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Guest_Pat_*
post Aug 20 2006, 08:47 AM
Post #14





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Do any of you school SLP's feel as I do that the schools are forcing us into teacher pegs? I have found that in the last 9 years doing my job as i know it is becoming increasingly harder..and subtle ethical issues have increased by the ton. Why should there be 2 standards for inclusion in speech therapy ; school and private standards. This is what is happening. It would be like asking a doctor to have 2 different types of treatments for the same problem. ( you know come to think of it I bet that happens!) Thoughts?
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Guest_Lou_*
post Aug 20 2006, 11:01 AM
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Pat, not sure what two standards you are referring to.

As a school SLP, you do seem to follow a separate set of guidelines for service. The thing to remember is that your services are to EQUALIZE educational opportunities. Often times that means providing a minimum of services necessary.

Is it bad or good? I think it is what it is. You know this going into the schools in the first place.

Sometimes it feels as if putting a bandaid on a bullet wound. I try to look on the positive side and make the best strides I can with the situation I'm in.
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Guest_Yep_*
post Aug 20 2006, 12:06 PM
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Private practice standards have their own limitations. For you to say that it's a double standard (private lets every minimal deficit qualify??) gives no credence to the fact that this (school) therapy is FREE to the public.

Rehab and private practitioners (I have provided services in both settings -school and privae pay) are very limited by reimbursement. Client's insurance pays for a limited amount of time.. or denies completely. If the parent doesn't have the money to pony up for private, well then they are stuck.

I have students who I have followed for 8 years with their AAC, language needs, etc, and no matter how minimal my services become, I feel they are much more functional and useful than what I would have been able to provide privately. I know of no private insurance that will allow me to come to a client's natural language environment and observe their comm., program device, adjust vocabulary, and train parents/teachers for *8* years.

I understand the limitations of school practice, but I also celebrate its purpose. I agree completely with the last poster that it "is what it is". Having worked with insurance reimbursement I don't ever want to be limited to 30 visits with a "severe" child again.

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Guest_Pat_*
post Aug 23 2006, 08:15 AM
Post #17





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Well, here are some examples of what I mean..My district strongly discourages us from taking any kid under 2nd. grade for artic. If I see a kid in the hall etc. who really, really needs x and I push for that child I am told they won't allow it because what will they say to all the other parents. Another example.. If I feel a child needs speech 4x a week 30 min. sessions I am told 3 is the max because we are just a public school and don't have to provide everything to the max. When I worked with little ones I noted that many had feeding difficulties at lunch in the lunchroom. I argued for lunch in a quieter setting and I wanted to work with the kids as part of their speech program. I was told I couldn't work on my lunch hour, or take a later one. I felt it was dangerous to let these kids continue without help so I fought and did get the right, but made many enemies. In conclusion, I feel if these kids went for private x they would get what they deserved. I realize the limitations of public schools and I agree with their philosophy, but as an SLP who was taught to provide the highest service it is hard to reconcile what I know should be done with what is actually done.
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Guest_Lou_*
post Aug 23 2006, 09:38 AM
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Pat, I can relate with your dilemma. Yes, I think any one of us working in the schools wants to ensure the children are getting the highest quality care.

I am sorry that you've made enemies along the way in trying to do the right thing. It seems to be our plight as school SLPs. We try to advocate for the students and we're viewed as radicals in the process.

I am wondering what rationale you were using to justify therapeutic feeding services in a public school (not a BOCES, I assume??). I have noted some questionable feeding skills of the Kindergarteners in the lunchroom at times. I spoke with the classroom teacher about snack time, instances of coughing, etc. and informed the social worker that I would be willing to speak with the parents if need be. Often times, these types of difficulties go hand-in-hand with other issues (fine and gross motor skills).

BTW, if a student needs speech 4 times a week in a regular public school setting, there should be a lot of data to back this up. I have had to argue for high frequencies like this in the past, but it is on a very rare occasion. Because this is a rare instance, and I can bring both standardized and non-standardized data to argue my point, my recommendation is considered. I don't always get the level of services I want. I just document it and keep that on file. Four sessions a week is not the standard. If you can get this at all for kids, consider yourself lucky.

My abilities to stretch myself are limited and I recognize that. I certainly would not give up my lunch period to work with kids because I am no union buster. You are entitled to some time for yourself and need it with a very busy work schedule! That is why we work under the auspices of a contract. When you break it, regardless of your intentions, you are sabotaging all of the rights and privileges your fellow members have faught to achieve. This will make you enemies of your colleagues, which is worse than when you have enemies in administration.

Do your best with the situation presented to you, Pat. That is all any of us can do. You don't get brownie points for running yourself ragged. In the end, all you would have to show for it is a disgruntled administrator, frazzled nerves, and MAYBE a kid who is not tongue thrusting when eating his PB and J.

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Guest_Yep_*
post Aug 23 2006, 10:29 AM
Post #19





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Well my experience hasn't been anything like yours. I do understand your frustrations, Pat, now that you have lined them out. MOST of our articulation students are under 2nd grade. We have pretty strict guidelines for weeding out developmental errors that will self-correct, but we have never been "discouraged" to reduce services.

I'm lucky in that I work with a specific population (autism, severe/rpofound, multiply disabled) and I choose service times and committee accepts them; that's that. I've never had a director deny 90 min a week, 120 min a week, individual services, consultation time written into an IEP, etc. However, I am not an SLP who goes out "recruiting". A child with an obvious phonological disorder in K? Sure, I'll take him (or give him to the other SLP in my building rather) but I don't go looking for extra work.

I'd be interested to know WHO exactly discourages your service recommendations? That seems like an IEP team ONLY kind of thing. Also, you guys must be much shorter staffed than we are.

Sorry for your experience. Not all schools will do that to you. I've been very blessed, I believe.


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Guest_Pat_*
post Aug 23 2006, 09:25 PM
Post #20





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Well the feeding group I was referring to were multiple handicapped kids ages 5 and 6. Some of them were not even verbal. Most would stuff their mouth and eventually spit food out. At the time and still, I feel if anything happened to those kids an attorney would along with a school advocate be pointing the finger at me as the person who should have been be aware of potential problems . I only worked with them if parents were aware and it was also written into an IEP. I think I may be ready to look else where!
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