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Guest_Jessie_*
post Dec 30 2007, 09:55 PM
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I am an SLP about to begin treating a 3-year old for a moderate articulation disorder. She is transferring to me from EI where they have been using touch cues to teach her correct placement. I was never trained in the use of touch cues and, where I normally work with older children, I have not needed to use them. I wondered if there are "universal" cues that everyone uses and, if so, where I could find a resource for that. Or...does everyone just make up their own?
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Guest_Guest_*
post Dec 31 2007, 01:07 AM
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Was the previous speech therapist perhaps using PROMPT?
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phillyslp
post Dec 31 2007, 08:48 AM
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PROMPT has their own specific cues where the clinician manipulates the child's articulators.
I use the visual-tactile cues developed by Judy Jelm. I learned them in graduate school. I do them myself while producing the specific phoneme, and have the child imitate me.
Some of the basics:
touch your nose for the /n/ sound
index finger to the upper lip for /t/ and /d/ (encourages placement to alveolar ridge)
slide index finger across closed lips for /m/
touch "adam's apple" for /k/ and /g/
index finger to cheek for /b/ and /p/.

Overall, I find visual-tactile cues very helpful for little ones to improve articulation. Good luck to you
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Guest_Jessie_*
post Dec 31 2007, 03:00 PM
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Phyllis, thank you for your very helpful information. Two other sounds we will be working on are /s/ and /f/...could you tell me what cues I would use for those?
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phillyslp
post Jan 2 2008, 08:46 AM
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For /s/ (which I call the "snake sound"), I trace my index finger down their arm, or across the table while saying the sound.
I call /f/ the "bunny rabbit sound"and encourage them to place their top teeth on top of their lips.
I don't specifically target these phonemes with kiddos this young per se, but if the child has an /s/ or at least an approximation, I reinforce it indirectly with the "touch cues"
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spchtx
post Jan 2 2008, 02:14 PM
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phillySLP- Do you have a web link for her, or a book that you have used. I'd love more info.
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Guest_Guest_guest_*
post Mar 17 2008, 03:24 PM
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phillySLP is it touch cheek for b and p or touch lip?
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Guest_Guest_*
post Mar 18 2008, 10:46 AM
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On the /s/ sound, Hodson recommends using a short finger on the arem instead of using the whole are (ie., wrist to shoulder) because that tends to make kids OVER do the /s/ and draw too much attention. Instead, she recommends a shorter, softer /s/.
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